The Transcontinental Computational Psychiatry Workgroup (TCPW) organizes a monthly web-based meeting and a computational psychiatry satellite meeting with the Society of Biological Psychiatry. We hope to foster discussion and exchange between those involved in computational psychiatry—a rapidly growing, highly multidisciplinary field.

Videos of past meetings are here.


Next workgroup meeting

Learning and decision-making in alcohol dependence: Trying to bridge the gap between models, rodent data and affected individuals

Miriam Sebold

  • Thursday, February 27th 2020 at 16:00 - 17:00 UTC (Other timezones)
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The mesolimbic dopaminergic system has been implicated in two kinds of reward processing, one in reinforcement learning and another in incentive salience attribution. Both mechanisms are assumed to play a major role in alcohol dependence with the former contributing to the persistence of chronic alcohol intake despite severe negative consequences and the latter promoting cue-induced craving and relapse.

I will here introduce common theoretical and computational models of learning and decision-making that might drive the development and maintenance of alcohol dependence. I will focus on building a translational bridge between animal findings in rodents and clinical studies in patient cohorts. In humans, I will present recent studies suggesting that these mechanisms might have predictive value of treatment responses in alcohol dependence. I will end my talk with a transdiagnostic perspective, stressing the importance to elucidate the role of learning and decision-making across diagnostic boundaries.

 

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Miriam Sebold
Postdoctoral research fellow
Research group Emotional Neuroscience
Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy
Campus Charité Mitte
Charité Universitätsmedizin
Berlin, Germany