The Transcontinental Computational Psychiatry Workgroup (TCPW) organizes a monthly web-based meeting and a computational psychiatry satellite meeting with the Society of Biological Psychiatry. We hope to foster discussion and exchange between those involved in computational psychiatry—a rapidly growing, highly multidisciplinary field.

Videos of past meetings are here.


Next workgroup meeting

TBC

Marion Rouault

  • Wednesday, June 10th 2020 at 16:00 - 17:00 UK (Other timezones)
  • General participation info   |   Participate online   |   + Phone-in United States (Toll Free): 1 877 309 2073 United States: +1 (571) 317-3129 Australia (Toll Free): 1 800 193 385 Australia: +61 2 8355 1020 Austria (Toll Free): 0 800 202148 Belgium (Toll Free): 0 800 78884 Canada (Toll Free): 1 888 455 1389 Denmark (Toll Free): 8090 1924 France (Toll Free): 0 805 541 047 Germany (Toll Free): 0 800 184 4222 Greece (Toll Free): 00 800 4414 3838 Hungary (Toll Free): (06) 80 986 255 Iceland (Toll Free): 800 9869 Ireland (Toll Free): 1 800 946 538 Israel (Toll Free): 1 809 454 830 Italy (Toll Free): 800 793887 Japan (Toll Free): 0 120 663 800 Luxembourg (Toll Free): 800 22104 Netherlands (Toll Free): 0 800 020 0182 New Zealand (Toll Free): 0 800 47 0011 Norway (Toll Free): 800 69 046 Poland (Toll Free): 00 800 1213979 Portugal (Toll Free): 800 819 575 Spain (Toll Free): 800 900 582 Sweden (Toll Free): 0 200 330 905 Switzerland (Toll Free): 0 800 740 393 United Kingdom (Toll Free): 0 800 169 0432 Access Code: 731-636-357

Metacognition, the ability to reflect on our own cognition and mental states, is a critical component of human subjective experience, and operates across many hierarchical levels of abstraction”encompassing “local” confidence in isolated decisions to “global” self-beliefs about our abilities and skills, and even more global constructs such as self-esteem. Alterations in metacognition are often considered foundational to neurological and psychiatric disorders, but it has historically been difficult to isolate and quantify metacognition independently of other cognitive performance features. I will present an initial large-scale study employing a transdiagnostic computational approach for identifying links between symptom dimensions and metacognitive abilities. However, a major determinant of human behaviour is not only “local” confidence in isolated decisions, but also an overall sense of confidence about our abilities and skills which I refer to as “global” self-beliefs. In a series of behavioural and neuroimaging studies, I show that human subjects can incorporate local decision confidence to form global self-beliefs over time, while also pervasively underestimating their performance in the absence of feedback. I will further show that subjects with low self-esteem report lower global self-beliefs despite a similar objective performance, suggesting that global self-beliefs may be more closely related to core symptoms of psychiatric disorders than local confidence. This work uncovering the neurocognitive foundations underpinning the formation of global self-beliefs in combination with transdiagnostic approaches is likely to prove informative for understanding alterations in self-evaluation across many dimensions of psychopathology.

IMG_2911.JPG
Marion Rouault
Postdoctoral Researcher
Department of Cognitive Studies
Ecole Normale Supérieure